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Five Foods to Help You Beat the Heat

1. Salads

Stay­ing hydrat­ed is key to keep­ing cool. When the after­noon sun has you sweat­ing, it’s easy to dehy­drate, leav­ing the body hot and fatigued. Let­tuce is 95 per­cent water so it keeps you both cool and hydrat­ed. Throw some cucum­bers on top, which are 96 per­cent water, and you’ve found the ide­al sum­mer meal.

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2. Watermelon

Not only is water­mel­on a sum­mer sta­ple for pic­nics and bar­be­cues, but it’s 90 per­cent water. “The pink flesh con­tains vit­a­mins C and A and the antiox­i­dant lycopene-which helps in pro­tect­ing you from the sun too,” accord­ing to Tanya Zucker­brot, reg­is­tered dietit­ian in New York City and the cre­ator of The F-Fac­tor Diet. “This is the per­fect snack to cool off and replen­ish elec­trolytes that are lost as you sweat in the sun.”

watermelon

3. Hot Peppers

Iron­i­cal­ly, spicy foods are a great way to beat the heat. Eat­ing some­thing that will cause sweat­ing, nature’s way of cool­ing us down, will allow you to with­stand the sun,” Zucker­brot said. Sweat­ing can lead to dehy­dra­tion, though, so make sure to con­sume sub­stan­tial water through­out the day.

So it’s a good time to order Iya Oyo’s spicy food

Abuja

4. Mint

Fresh mint can be grown in the gar­den and pro­vides an instant cool­ing sen­sa­tion. It’s a zero-calo­rie addi­tion that will fresh­en any drink or snack.

5. Non-Alcoholic Beverages

Skip the mar­gar­i­tas and moji­tos. A sum­mer­time cock­tail might seem like just the thing for a warm evening, but too much alco­hol can cause your body to lose water,” Karen Ansel, MS, reg­is­tered dietit­ian nutri­tion­ist and spokesper­son for the Acad­e­my of Nutri­tion and Dietet­ics said.

If water starts to sound bland, rethink your ice cubes, she sug­gests. Adding frozen berries, grapes or mel­on chunks to sparkling water is a refresh­ing way to switch things up.

If water still doesn’t hit the spot, don’t feel you have to ditch your iced cof­fee or tea, she explained. “Even though we’ve heard over and over that caf­feinat­ed drinks are dehy­drat­ing, it’s just not true. Accord­ing to the Insti­tute of Med­i­cine, caf­feinat­ed bev­er­ages like cof­fee and tea can still help keep you hydrat­ed because they sup­ply more water than their caf­feine caus­es us to lose. So if they help you drink up, go ahead.”

 

 

Culled from the weath­er peo­ple —  Accuweath­er

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